519 WashingtonPerf. 11 Imperforate sheets of#344 were perforatedto create #519. Imperforate sheets of#344 were perforatedto create #519. Accidental Variety Created in 1917 with the #519 Stamp In 1917, the New York postmaster had about #519 stamp by adding fake perforations to the more 1,500 sheets of imperforate 2¢ stamps of the common #344. Mystic’s stamp expertise assures 1908 issue (#344). When he tried to return them you’ll receive the correct stamp. for credit, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing Scott Number Mint Used instead had the stamps perforated and released for 1917 Design of 1908-09 general sale. Most were used and destroyed before Double Line Watermark, collectors learned of their existence – making them Perforated 11 difficult to find now. Today, forgers attempt to create the scarcer 519 2¢ carmine............................$710.00 $1,500.00 523 524 547 Franklin #523 an Error in Color… The 1918 $2 Franklin stamp – U.S. #523 – pictures the Founding Father in black with a striking orange red frame. Two years after it was issued, the $2 Franklin stamp – U.S. #547 – suddenly appeared with a carmine frame. Collectors thought they’d discovered a color error, which postal officials denied. Upon further investigation, they learned the original 1918 stamp was the error! Because the discovery was made more than two years after U.S. #523 was issued, few were saved – making the stamp scarce today. Stamps of 1918 Unwatermarked Mint Used 523 $2 orange red & black.... $1,250.00 $350.00 524 $5 deep green & black ... 425.00 55.00 1920 Flat Plate Printing, Perforated 11 547 $2 carmine & black......... 435.00 45.00 The Switch to Offset Printing Effective November 2, 1917, the first-class during World War I. The ink contained so much letter rate rose to 3¢, which greatly increased the grit that printing plates wore out in about 10 days, demand for 3¢ stamps – and also for 1¢ stamps, faster than it took to make them. So the Bureau to go with 2¢ stamps and stamped envelopes switched temporarily to offset printing, for which already purchased. plates could be produced much more rapidly. Operating at full capacity, the Bureau of Later, a more satisfactory ink was found, and the Engraving and Printing found its ink to be of higher-quality engraving process used previously poor quality – probably due to difficult conditions was re-established. 531 535 Washington 532, 533,534, 534A 525 529, 530 536 526-28B Scott Number Mint Used Scott Number Mint Used 1918-20 Offset PrintingOffset Printing – Imperforate Perforated 11 531 1¢ gray green............... $25.00 $25.00 525 1¢ gray green............... $6.00 $.75 532 2¢ carmine rose (IV) .... 110.00 95.00 526 2¢ carmine (IV) ............ 47.50 5.00 533 2¢ carmine (V) ............. 425.00 200.00 527 2¢ carmine (V) ............. 40.00 1.35 534 2¢ carmine (Va) ........... 42.50 37.50 528 2¢ carmine (Va) ........... 19.00 .75 534A 2¢ carmine (VI) ............ 140.00 100.00 528A 2¢ carmine (VI) ............ 75.00 1.35 535 3¢ violet ....................... 17.00 16.00 528B 2¢ carmine (VII) ........... 42.50 .35 1919 Perforated 121/2 529 3¢ violet (III)................. 8.50 .50 536 1¢ gray green............... 39.00 45.00 530 3¢ purple (IV)............... 2.50 .25 1919 VICTORY ISSUE COMMEMORATIVE Mint Used 537 3¢ violet................................................... $16.50 $4.95 This stamp was inspired by America’s victory in World War I, known as “The war to end all wars.” The stamp’s design features the victorious goddess of liberty, wearing armor and helmet. In one hand she holds a sword, and in the other the balanced “scales of justice.” Directly behind Liberty is the Stars and Stripes, surrounded by the flags of America’s closest allies: Great Britain, Belgium, Italy, and France. #537 is becoming scarcer and harder to find every day. 537 “Victory” and Flags of Allies 541 542 546 540, 540a 543 Washington 1919-21 “Coil Waste” Issues... Interesting Varieties forStamp Collectors A supply of coil stamp sheets had been set aside in 1919 as “waste” due perforated horizontally with the current 11-gauge machines. So the stamps, Scott numbers 538, 540, and 541, were issued with 11 horizontal by 10 vertical perforations. Other sheets intended as coils had been perforated 10 horizontally (top and bottom) and were now perforated 11 vertically. So #542 is perforated 10 by 11. Still others were imperf and were given perforations 10 x 10 or 11 x 11. The 11 x 11 coil waste stamps are especially scarce today. 1919-21 Coil Waste Stamps, Perf. 11x10 538 1¢ green........................................................ $20.00 $19.00 540 2¢ carmine rose (III)...................................... 18.50 16.00 540a 2¢ pair, imperforate horizontal...................... 90.00 - - - 541 3¢ violet (II)................................................... 75.00 72.50 Perforated 10x11 to poor centering or other defects. They had been perforated vertically, or 542 1¢ green........................................................ 16.00 1.60 horizontally, while some were not perforated at all. Perforated 10 Usually such “coil waste” stamps were destroyed. But in an economy 543 1¢ green........................................................ 1.10 .25 measure, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing decided to issue the stamps Perforated 11 in sheets. A quantity of stamps, already perforated 10 vertically, were 545 1¢ green........................................................ 250.00 250.00 546 2¢ carmine rose............................................ 165.00 195.00 17
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