Experimental Paper on a2¢ Stamp Reprint GivesBluish-Gray Look In 1909, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing was experiencing shrinkage of stamp paper. In an experiment, about 1/3 rag stock was added to the wood pulp in hopes of reducing the shrinkage. The change didn’t help much and was soon abandoned. Stamps printed on the experimental paper are bluish gray in appearance and are scarce collector favorites today. 367 368 369 Lincoln Imperforate Blue Paper 1909 Commemorative Honors Our 16th President’s Birth On the 100th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth in 1909, a 2¢ commemorative went on sale. Based on a statue in Chicago by Augustus St. Gaudens, the stamp was issued both perforate and imperforate, as well as on experimental paper – the scarce #369. 1909 was also the first year of the Lincoln penny. Scott Number Mint Used 1909 COMMEMORATIVES Lincoln Memorial Issue 367 2¢ carmine................... $9.95 $2.95 368 2¢ carmine imperforate................... 52.50 55.00 369 2¢ carmine (on bluish-gray paper)........ 295.00 300.00 Seldom-Seen Parcel Post Postage Due StampUsed to account for postage due on Parcel Post mail, this Postage Due stamp became valid for regular postage six months after it was issued. No further printings were made and the remaining Parcel Post Postage Due stamp supply was destroyed. Important U.S. postal history for your collection. JQ4 1913 10¢ Parcel Post Postage Due Stamp, Dark Green, Mint ..........$175.00 370 William H. Seward 371 Imperforate Scott Number Mint Used 1909 Alaska-Yukon Pacific Exposition 370 2¢ carmine, perforated 12 $17.50 $2.50 371 2¢ carmine, imperforate 50.00 45.00 The Alaska-Yukon Issue of 1909 Honors William Seward Seattle, Washington, held the Alaskan- Yukon Exposition to celebrate the development of this far-northern territory. A commemorative publicized both the Territory and the Exposition. The original design for this stamp was a seal on an ice floe. Afraid potential visitors would think Alaska was always icy cold, the Exposition Committee opted for a portrait of William Seward. Seward negotiated the purchase of Alaska from Russia in 1867 for just $7.2 million. Most Alaska-Yukon stamps were issued perforate (#370). A far smaller number were imperforate (#371). Today, the imperforates are difficult to find in both mint and used condition. 372 “Half Moon” and “Clermont” 373 Imperforate 1909 Hudson-Fulton Celebration 372 2¢ carmine, perforated 12 15.75 6.00 373 2¢ carmine, imperforate 59.00 52.00 Two Hudson River Events Honored In 1609 (300 years earlier), Henry Hudson discovered the river in his sailing ship, the Half Moon; and in 1807, Robert Fulton proved that his steamship, the Clermont, did indeed work – the first successful navigation with a steampowered ship. This stamp pictures both the Hudson and Fulton ships. The Native Americans in canoes show the first means of navigating this scenic river. Far fewer imperforate stamps were issued, so the #373 stamps are much scarcer. 374 375 376 Franklin Washington Washington 377 378 379 Washington Washington Washington 380 381 382 Washington Washington Washington Scott Number Mint Used Series of 1910-11 Single Line Watermark, Perforated 12 374 1¢ green ....................... $14.50 $.30 375 2¢ carmine.................... 15.00 .30 376 3¢ deep violet ............... 30.00 2.50 377 4¢ brown....................... 47.50 1.00 378 5¢ blue.......................... 42.50 1.10 379 6¢ red orange ............... 60.00 1.25 380 8¢ olive green............... 165.00 37.50 381 10¢ yellow..................... 170.00 9.00 382 15¢ ultramarine............. 375.00 37.50 383 384 Franklin Washington 1910 Single Line WatermarkImperforate 383 1¢ green ....................... 6.00 3.75 384 2¢ carmine.................... 15.00 2.50 A New Single Line WatermarkPaper is Introduced In 1910, a new single line watermark paper was introduced. It was stronger and more uniform in thickness than the old double line paper. Designs were the same as on the 1908-09 issue. See page 152 to order watermark fluid and tray. “Mystic is the only stamp company I deal with which publishes a catalog of all U.S. stamps. Good work, don’t stop!” –H.M. Easton, PA 13
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